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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
not just idiosyncratic, ideologically-generated products of the george w. bush administration. as we describe in our book, these stem from a much deeper source that cuts across both democratic and republican administrations, and it's something we describe as the united states, essentially, giving in to a post-cold war temptation to act as an imperial power in the middle east. and it is this imperial turn in america's middle east policies pursued with very little regard for realities on the ground in the middle east that have proven not just quixotic, but deeply damaging to american interests. as a candidate back in twaipt, now-president obama then seemed to really understand this. he talked about it courageously during the campaign. he pledged to not just withdraw american troops from iraq, but to change what he called the american mindset that had gotten us into the strategic mistake of invading iraq in the first place. he pledged to really change america's middle east policies. but instead the obama administration has pursued the same sorts of policies as its predecessors, the same
party over the past four years since george w. bush left town is roger els. he's run the party, he's run the conservative movement. when roger els decides she's not worth the trouble, then that means that conservatism's moving in a new direction. i talked about what happened this weekend at "the national review" institute's talk. i was really surprised. really surprised by what i heard. and heartened, whether it was bill kristol or john hatoritz. also scott walker who is doing really well up in wisconsin. and all the republicans got up there, and they were saying the same thing. we've got to stop being the stupid party. we've been saying here for six months, we have got to -- and john, i thought, had one of the best points, that we have stifled debate. the conservative movement has stifled debate. and if you go out and you dare to stand out in a crowd, whether it's on taxes or regulations or in the past on immigration, you were completely shunned from the party. finally there's an understanding we've got to grow the party. what we've been saying for quite frankly for years and getting at
and that the united states is not engaged. >> look at george w. bush. in 2000 he said he would have a restrained, humble foreign policy. then 9/11 hit. and now we've been dealing with wars for over a decade. we have already made reference to it while the chinese have been investing in africa. we've been dropping bombs in iraq. we are now in afghanistan. 12 years in. $2 billion a week. our defense budget keeps exploding. so an iranian crisis comes at the absolute worst time for this country. >> that's what i was saying early on. >> on so many points. >> things could change dramatically this year. >> richard and i have talked about this a lot. in search of a metaphor, have i been thinking about the islamic role in africa and the middle east, think of it size a large, very dry forest after years of drought. and a lightning strike anywhere, which is unanticipated, starts a brush fire. and then it goes across. we just saw what happened in algeria. what's going on in syria at the moment. and we are not dealing state-to-state. there's an entirely new set of rules for dealing with that critical part of
george w. bush. he's currently a senior adviser at the united states institute of peace. welcome to both of you. first, zbigniew brzezinski, your thoughts on john kerry as nominee for secretary of state? >> i think he's an absolutely top-notch choice. very good. experienced, solid, energetic with a broad vision and with a strong focus on trying to stabilize those parts of the world that are especially dangerous. i think he's practical, intelligent, well informed. >> brown: stephen hadley? >> he's in a way spent his whole life preparing for this job and it's good he did because he takes in the a very challenging time and i think he's going to have a lot of challenges before him. i think one of them is to prioritize where he's going to put his time. >> brown: well, you know, he spoke about the economy, getting the economy right first and foremost. he said "more than ever foreign policy is economic policy." did that sound right to you? >> i think that's right and i think this is a man who's grown up, really, in the political military side of foreign policy and national security and i think
director. before that, the president could appoint anyone he wanted. so when president george w. bush nominated michael sullivan, it looked like an easy path, but he couldn't get a vote in a republican-controlled senate. >> did i ever think for a moment my nomination would be held up by a senator from idaho as related to one firearm licensed dealer? no. i didn't. >> idaho senator larry craig along with two other republican, all staunch supporters of the nra, held up sullivan's nomination, but it wasn't the nra's hands at work. it was about one local idaho gun seller's dispute with the atf. even silver himself said the nra didn't derail him. >> i didn't get any sense at all that the industry was opposed to my nomination. nor even the nra. >> when president obama took office, the senate just sat on his first nominee, andrew traver, even conservatives like house republican darrell issa called for action. >> andrew traver, who i believe is the 2010, november 2010 dezinate, should in fact be given an up or down vote. should in fact be given an opportunity to be confirmed. >> but republican
but no one will dispute the fact that george w. bush was aiming for the bleachers with his second inaugural with what he called his freedom speech which is -- in terms of projecting american force, moral and military around the world in the wake of 9/11 and the doctrine of preemptive military action. >> you knows the reference to lincoln, we talk about being in a divided america now. in many ways we are politically. but you think about lincoln and that inauguration, both of his, it was a different level. >> different level all together. he is involved in the conflict where half a million people would be killed, the end of channeled slavery. a lot is at stake. we're fighting now but not anywhere like that, thank god. >> we're about to see the introduction of the first lady of the united states, michelle obama. as you watched her grow in this role the last four years, what do you think? >> well she has done -- she is a, the most popular person in america just about. she has firmed up the sense of this family as a very responsible family that people can relate to, which was not always going to
. >> and david gregory, about a two-mile drive. >> and you remember in the modern era, george w. bush -- the language plate is -- >> yeah, the license plate just for a second here is a story. it's a -- kind of a protest legal local license plate here in washington, d.c. taxation without representation. the president has opted to use them on all the limousines. >> and that always comes up for presidents. >> d.c. has a delegate, a nonvoting member of congress. >> george w. bush met president clinton and they got along famously. they were swapping stories and how bush raised the sector of the shadow returns every time clinton would try to campaign for al gore. so that was chummier. and they kept on a pretty good relationship. >> you don't have to look that far back. in 2008, you had george w. bush and president-elect obama riding over together. while i think the obamas were pleasantly surprised as how smooth the transition was, how the bush administration bent over backward toes make sure there was a smooth transition of power, obama had run against bush and the bush policies and to this
. george w. bush got 62 million votes in the 2004 election and conservatives said he had a mandate. barack obama got 62 million votes in the two -- 2012 election, and conservatives started a secessionist movement. but the obama campaign took it to them and made a difference in the end. they helped create a new electorate, a coalition of concerned and they turned it out on election day. our two political parties are separate and not equal. the percentage of republicans who are white has remained fairly steady since 2000 at about 87%. the percentage of democrats who are white in contrast has dropped from 64% in 2000 to 55% now. independents have gone from 79% to 67% white since 2000. the depth of republican dependence on white voters explains a lot about the recent election. not least about its outcome. republican efforts to suppress minority voters back fired big time. [applause] in florida alone, 266,000 more hispanics voted than in 2008. similarly in ohio, 209,000 more blacks voted than in 2008. overall, while romney received 59% of the white vote, all hot -- obama -- omaha? obama got 93%
is effectively following the policy that george w. bush did beforeha beforehand. going forward, i think israelis -- on the he them will say can they do this? i tend to subscribe to the view that a healthy relationship between them and the u.s. is going to have to be fungal. but i also agree with the view that obama is unlikely to take that action in the near term 37. >> david, last question. speaking of north africa, while we've got you, the latest on the algerian situation seems -- the information still is becoming to us not this any real sort of clarified way. what happens now? do you think president obama will have to address a new approach to africa? >> the u.s. has been building in north africa for at least a decade, in toerchls trying to build up the ministry of mali, particularly the algerian army doesn't heed to a -- yeah, that's for sure. it could be weeks, months, years. thank you so much both for your time. stay with us. straight ahead, we'll have a look at travel casts across the continent. we'll be right back. ♪ [ male announcer ] how do you turn an entrepreneur's dream... ♪ int
of staff for president george w. bush and the 41st president of the united states, texas a & m university, mr. andy card joins us. as chief of staff, you have to set an agenda for the president. what is the challenge with the second term as opposed to the first? >> first of all, today is a day of celebration. yesterday was as well. but today will be the real public day of celebration and i'll be celebrating it, too. president obama is my president, too. i look forward to him taking the oath of office. i want to hear that inaugural speech. but i can tell you, there is going to be a lot of heavy lifting that has to take place in order for the president to be success envelope a second term. that's when the blues start to set in, when you realize how tough the job is and it's not just about the issues that you can anticipate meeting. it's the ones that you don't anticipate that you have to meet. and so i hope he moves from being an i president. he was very much an i president during his first term. i, i, i, i, i. the second term had better be a we. i'm not talking about a campaign slogan. yes
supported ronald reagan when he sent troops out. i supported george h. w. bush when he sent troops to panama. i supported president clinton when against the will of the congress, he did what was needed to be done in bosnia, closet vow, and so forth. and in this particular instance, i think the president behaviored in that tradition. >> i would argue that the constitution has no exceptions for when you're having a tough time or people disagree with you that you go ahead and do it. >> in the early 1970s affiliate vietnam you were critical of the bombing in cambodia. i think you felt it wasn't authorized by congress. has your opinion changed about the bombing in cambodia? how is cambodia different than libya? >> nor did my opinion change or has it ever altered about the war itself where i don't believe, and i argued that. >> was cambodia different than libya? >> yeah, it was. it was an extension of the war being prosecuted without the involvement of congress after a number of years. that's very different. >> length of time. but similar circumstances bombing campaign unthorszed by congress. the
on it immediately. i supported ronald reagan when he sent troops into grenada. i supported george h.w. bush when he sent troops into panama. i supported president clinton, when, against the will of the congress, he did what was needed to be done in kosovo and bosnia and so forth. in this case, i think the president has behaved in that tradition. >> i would argue the constitution doesn't have an exception -- that when you are having tough times, the constitution says that you just go ahead and do it. after vietnam, you were quite critical of the bombing in cambodia because you felt that it was not authorized by congress. has your opinion changed about the bombing in cambodia? how is cambodia different from libya? >> my attitude has not changed about vietnam itself. >> what about cambodia? >> it was the extension of a war prosecuted without the involvement of congress after a number of years. that is very different. >> length of time, but similar circumstances. and obama campaign and authorized by congress. it is not this kind of latitude to sometimes go to war and to sometimes not go to war. i thoug
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)